Institute for Climate and Atmospheric Science (ICAS)

Leeds chemist wins prestigious Royal Society of Chemistry Award

04.05.2018 - 14:09

Martyn Chipperfield

Professor Martyn Chipperfield, who works at the School of Earth and Environment in the Institute for Climate and Atmospheric Science, is the Royal Society of Chemistry John Jeyes Award winner for 2018. 

Professor Chipperfield builds computer models of atmospheric chemistry and applies these to global pollution issues such as depletion of the ozone layer, climate change and degradation in surface air quality. It is important to understand these changes in order to predict future evolution of the atmosphere in response to policy decisions.

He said: “[I am] extremely happy and honoured to receive this award from the Royal Society of Chemistry.”

The John Jeyes Award is given for significant contributions to our understanding of atmospheric chemistry and processes governing its change. Professor Chipperfield receives £2,000 and a medal, and will complete a UK lecture tour.

Dr Robert Parker, chief executive of the Royal Society of Chemistry said:

“The chemical sciences are vital for the wellbeing of our world and chemical scientists help to change people’s lives for the better. That’s why we’re so proud to celebrate the innovation and expertise of our community through our Prizes and Awards.

“This year’s inspiring and influential winners come from a range of specialisms, backgrounds, countries and communities. Each has done their bit to advance excellence in the chemical sciences – to improve the lives of people around the world now and in the future.”

Our winners are recognised for the originality and impact of their research, or for their contributions to the chemical sciences industry or chemistry education. The Awards also acknowledge the importance of teamwork across the chemical sciences, and the abilities of individuals to develop successful collaborations.

An illustrious list of 50 previous winners of the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Awards have gone on to win Nobel Prizes for their pioneering work, including 2016 Nobel laureates Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart and Ben Feringa.

More information is available at: rsc.li/prizes-awards

 

 

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