School of Earth and Environment

James Shaw James Shaw

Postgraduate Researcher

Email address: eejis@leeds.ac.uk
Room: 101d

Affiliation: Institute of Applied Geoscience

Qualifications

2013 - 2017: MSci Geology, School of Ocean & Earth Science, University of Southampton, 1st Class Honours

Advanced Independent Research Project: Does the southern Alpine Fault act as a barrier to cross-fault fluid flow? (Supervisors: Dr Catriona Menzies, Professor Damon Teagle)

Memberships/Fellowships

Irish Association for Economic Geologists (IAEG)

Prospectors & Developers Association of Canada (PDAC)

Society of Economic Geologists (SEG)

The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain & Ireland

Research Interests

Structural controls on ore mineralisation

The structural and geochemical evolution of orogenic gold systems

The role of fluids on the strength of crustal fault zones

Teaching Interests

Structural Geology

Geological Mapping

Ore and Mineral Geology

Support duties

Demonstrator on:

SOEE1580 Geology 2 (Geological Maps and Stratigraphy practicals, Pembrokeshire fieldtrip)

SOEE1212 Gold and Precious Metals (Scotland fieldtrip)

Funding

Leeds-York NERC Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) 2017 (CASE: GSNI, Dalradian Resources Inc.)

SEG Graduate Student Fellowship (GSF) (US$5000.00)

Start date

1 October 2017

Publications

Conference Item

Shaw, JI; Manuc, G; Torvela, TM; Chapman, RJ. 2018 Structural and geochemical approaches to understanding orogenic gold mineralization. [Poster] In: Mineral Deposits Study Group 2017-2018 AGM, Brighton, England, 3-5 January 2018. University of Brighton, Brighton, 2018.

Awards and Funding

London International Youth Science Forum Participant, 2013: A Palaeomagnetic Study of the Etive Dyke Swarm, Scottish Caledonides: A record of rapid continental movement in Early Devonian times (University of Liverpool; Dr John Piper)

National Science + Engineering Competition Finalist, 2012-2013: A Palaeomagnetic Study of the Etive Dyke Swarm, Scottish Caledonides: A record of rapid continental movement in Early Devonian times (University of Liverpool; Dr John Piper)