School of Earth and Environment

Julia Leventon Dr Julia Leventon

Lecturer in Environmental Change and Development

Telephone number: +44(0) 113 34 31635
Email address: J.Leventon@leeds.ac.uk
Room: 9.118

Biography

I joined the University of Leeds in October 2011 as a research fellow and recently progressed to lecturer. While at Leeds, my work has focussed on climate compatible development in sub-Saharan Africa.

I completed my PhD at the Central European University in Hungary. My PhD was funded by a Marie Curie Early Stage Researcher fellowship through the Aquatrain research training network. The fellowship included two six-month secondments to the Technical University of Crete (Greece) and the EC Joint Research Centre (Italy).

Prior to beginning my academic career, I have worked in environmental consultancy (EIA and renewable energy) in the UK, and for a non-profit organisation in Lima, Peru. Indeed, my time in Peru sparked my interest in the interactions between people and their physical environment and the implications for management.

I combine work with a love of running, travel and languages.

For more information on me and my research, follow me on twitter or visit my blog:

http://twitter.com/julialeventon

http://jleventon.wordpress.com

Qualifications

PhD Environmental Policy (2011, Summa cum laude), Central European University, Budapest, Hungary

MSc. International Development: Environment and Development (2007, Distinction), Institute of Development Policy and Management, University of Manchester, UK

BSc. (Hons) Environmental Science (2006, First), School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Science, University of Manchester, UK

Memberships/Fellowships

Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society

Member of the Development Studies Association

Research Interests

I am an interdisciplinary environmental social scientist working to understand policy implementation and formulation in the field of natural resource management. My research examines governance networks, including the ideas and actions of policy actors, and the structures that shape them. My approach to research ensures that I consider the multi-level, interdisciplinary nature of governance networks.

I use mixed methods including stakeholder analysis, elite interview and participatory methods.

In-depth case studies have included the management of arsenic in groundwater and soils in Europe and ecosystem services in sub-Saharan Africa.

Teaching Interests

I teach:

Environmental Science for Environmental Management to first year undergraduates; and

Poverty, Environment and Sustainable Development to second year undergraduates.

I also contribute research-based case studies to other modules.

Publications