School of Earth and Environment

Jennifer Dentith Jennifer Dentith

Postgraduate Researcher

Email address: eejed@leeds.ac.uk
Room: 11.121

Affiliation: Earth Surface Science Institute, Institute for Climate and Atmospheric Science

Biography

I am a third year PhD student working in the Earth Surface Science Institute (ESSI) and the Institute for Climate and Atmospheric Science (ICAS). My research involves incorporating chemical ocean circulation tracers into complex numerical models to improve our understanding of deglacial ocean circulation.

Qualifications

2013-2014: MSc Applied Meteorology and Climatology, University of Birmingham

2010-2013: BSc (Hons) Natural Sciences (Earth Sciences and Geography), Durham University

Memberships/Fellowships

  • Royal Meteorological Society - Associate fellow (student)

Research groups

Research Interests

I have a broad interest in climate dynamics, palaeoclimatic reconstruction and anthropogenic climate change. I am especially interested in studying climate transitions and mechanisms over a wide range of timescales (from tectonic to decadal) with a view to understanding and constraining current and future climate change impacts.

Teaching Interests

  • SOEE1020 - Ice Age Environments and the Quaternary Evolution of the British Isles
  • SOEE1400 - Introduction to Meteorology and Weather Forecasting
  • SOEE5540M - Climate Change: Physical Science Basis

Project details

Project title

Understanding abrupt climate transitions using geological tracers of ocean circulation

Supervisors

Funding

Leeds-York NERC Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP)

Start date

1 October 2015

Project outline

The main aim of this project is to use ocean geochemical tracer simulations to improve our understanding of deglacial ocean circulation. This will be addressed by 4 key objectives:

  1. Implement carbon isotopes (abiotic 14C, biotic 14C, and δ13C) into the FAMOUS General Circulation Model.
  2. Investigate the isotopic fingerprint of different Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) strengths and stability regimes (as characterised by net freshwater transport into the South Atlantic Ocean, Fov).
  3. Investigate changes in the isotopic fingerprint of the AMOC associated with idealised and deglacial freshwater forcing.
  4. Evaluate the feasibility of different scenarios to explain past (abrupt) oceanic/climatic transitions.

Conference contributions

Dentith J; Gregoire L; Tindall J; Ivanovic R (2018) Simulating carbon isotopes in the ocean model of the FAMOUS GCM. Past Earth Networks General Conference, Leeds, UK, 19 – 21 June (poster)

Ivanovic R; Gregoire L; Burke A; Wickert A; Valdes P; Ng HC; Robinson L; McManus J; Mitrovica J; Lee L; Dentith J (2018) Acceleration of northern ice sheet melt triggered AMOC slowdown and northern cooling 19-18 ka. EGU General Assembly, Vienna, Austria, 9 – 13 April (oral)

Dentith J; Ivanovic R; Gregoire L; Tindall J; Robinson LF (2017) The radiocarbon fingerprint of different Meridional Overturning Circulations. PMIP4, Stockholm, Sweden, 25 – 29 September (poster)

Dentith J; Ivanovic R; Gregoire L; Tindall J; Robinson LF (2017) The radiocarbon fingerprint of different Meridional Overturning Circulations. Goldschmidt, Paris, France, 13 – 18 August (poster)

Dentith J; Ivanovic R; Gregoire L; Tindall J; Robinson LF (2017) Simulating radiocarbon in the ocean model of the FAMOUS GCM. EGU General Assembly, Vienna, Austria, 23 – 28 April (poster)

Publications