School of Earth and Environment

Caroline Ward Caroline Ward

Postgraduate Student

Email address: eecwa@leeds.ac.uk
Room: 9.157m

Affiliation: Sustainability Research Institute

Biography

I am a PhD student working with Professor Lindsay Stringer and Dr George Holmes as part of the Sustainability Research Institute. My project aims to explore the ways in which the governance processes of protected areas interact with ecosystem services and livelihood strategies to impact upon local well-being in Madagascar.

Previously to starting my PhD I have worked on multiple conservation projects around the globe, inlcuding in Madagascar, The Seychelles, Bonaire and Belize.

Find me on twitter: @carolinefmward

Qualifications

  • 2013 MSc Conservation Science, Imperial College
    • Research project: Social dynamics of a human-wildlife conflict: understanding attitudes and behaviours towards Yellow-shouldered Amazon Parrots in Bonaire

  • 2011 BSc Zoology (specialising in Conservation & Ecology), University of Southampton

Memberships/Fellowships

  • British Ecological Society: Student member
  • Society for Conservation Biology: Student member
  • Zoological Society of London: Student fellow

Project details

Project title

Protected area governance and livelihood security

Supervisors

Professor L. Stringer and Dr G. Holmes

Funding

NERC DTP

Start date

1st October 2014

Project outline

Protected areas (PAs) are one of the most commonly used conservation tools, despite criticisms of their ability to both conserve biodiversity and provide benefits to local communities. Movement away from state-led ‘fortress approaches’ towards involving local communities in the governance structure of PAs has followed a shift in their aims i.e. they are now expected to deliver benefits beyond biodiversity protection, such as poverty reduction. However, the creation of a PA will always involve trade-offs and evidence for a win-win for conservation and development remains elusive. Most frequently it is local communities who lose out, while the benefits of PAs are shared globally.

Although the importance of governance, simplistically defined as referring to principles, policies and rules regarding decision making, is now being appreciated within the conservation community, as documented by the release of the IUCN good governance principles and the inclusion of governance in the CBD 2020 target 11, there has been little research into how different governance approaches and processes may affect local communities’ well-being.

The aim of this project is to explore the ways in which the governance processes of protected areas interact with ecosystem services and livelihood strategies to impact upon local well-being in Madagascar. This will be achieved by investigating communities surrounding protected areas which are co-managed by NGOs and local communities

Publications